Home > Software Defined Datacenter, Software Defined Storage, Uncategorized > Is VSA the future of Software Defined Storage? (In reply to DuncanYB)

Is VSA the future of Software Defined Storage? (In reply to DuncanYB)


I was reading a blog post by Duncan Epping here http://www.yellow-bricks.com/2013/04/24/re-is-vsa-the-future-of-software-defined-storage-openi/ around VSA’s and software defined storage, and put in one of my usually overly long replies when I thought it might make a reasonable blog post here, because it outlines a number of my key thoughts on this which I was planning on writing about later on. If you get the chance, read Duncan’s post as theres some good stuff in the main blog as well as some interesting comments.

The following was my reply with some typo cleanup …

IMHO VSA’s will be an important part of the software defined storage (SDS) landscape but by no means are they the complete story. What is lacking in SDS is the equivalent of flow-tables in switches. If you go with the whole “separate the control plane from the data plane” definition of software defined anything, then you could reasonably argue that this is exactly what things like the VERITAS volume manager and file system did way back in the 80’s. For a whole stack of good reasons people chose to bifurcate that responsibility of managing that functionality increasingly into the storage and application layers, leaving those product with increasingly niche roles. The advent of SDS might change swing that pendulum back towards 80’s style architecture for a while, but people tend towards vertically integrated solutions when the complexities of managing and integrating solutions themselves becomes economically unviable, and designing a reliable storage solution with high performance at large scale that caters for a large variety or workload types is very very hard to do well.

Going back to the lack of a storage equivalent of flow-tables, the trouble with SDS is that storage requirements are much less homogenous than switching requirements and much harder to bring down to a small number of discrete functions that can be acclerated in hardware. I think that over time these will become more obvious, the first and most obvious of which is copy offload/management, but these requirements will probably evolve over time.

Rather than focus on building an industry/standards defined theoretical model, and trying to wedge/judge all the designs by that model, I think we’d be better served by loosening up the vertical integration of storage systems and then finding a variety of creative ways of leveraging large amounts of cheap CPU/Memory/Cache/Disk sitting in the virtualisation layer. VSA’s are a fairly coarse grained way of achieving this, but many of them don’t elegantly leverage tightly/vertically integrated infrastructure to accelerate or drive efficiencies where that is appropriate.

For example, there are ways of using the hypervisor resources as a “data plane” and leaving the control plane in the centralised array, such as NetApp FlashAccel . This is kind of counter-intuitive to the existing “control-plane lives in the hypervisor” model as the cache is seen as an extension of the hardware array rather than the array being seen as an extension of the hypervisor. To be fair the model isn’t that pure, as control portions are distributed between the array and they hypervisor. My point is that the boundaries become a lot fuzzier, and will be functionality will be divided and combined in a variety of interesting ways,  and so long as storage is asked to perform so many different tasks, I think that’s a good thing.

While I love VSAs as a conceptually neat little package of functionality with tightly defined boundaries, (The DataONTAP VSA’s in particular, especially if you’re aware of their roadmap)  I think that data and storage management will for the foreseeable future be a shared responsibility between applications, hypervisors, operating systems and arrays. The biggest challenge we face is co-ordinating these responsibilities and choosing the most efficient and automatable ways of combining them to give customers what they need without needlessly locking them into inflexible architecture choices.

Regards

John Martin

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